This lucky person can afford music lessons!

Footballer X has refused a £50,000-a-week salary plus a bonus payment of £500,000.
Footballer Y is reputed to earn £250,000 a week.
The teaching budget for all Arts and Humanities subjects within the University Sector is cut by 100%.
I wonder who practices more, footballers or violinists, goalkeepers or pianists. No contest if England’s recent form is anything to go by!
10 per cent of the UK workforce earned less than £276 a week while in full-time employment (see http://www.statistics.gov.uk/cci/nugget.asp?id=285).

Enough said…

The Curriculum – all that is taught and learnt…
Core and hidden…
Planned and received…
Formal and informal…

 

Can we have an informed debate please?

We find ourselves in an historic time when education is about to the redefined by the course of political determination, we would be well advised to be mindful of the purpose of education and how teaching and learning occurs. While the nature and content of learning experiences have already changed due to the technological revolution, for whatever reason and whatever political persuasion suits you or I, the presence and provision for a range of subjects and learning processes are possibly about to change through a course of action that will be described as progressive, radical, essential, urgent… or reactive, dangerous and without educational rationale – depending upon your perspective.

Would it not be prudent to be informed? Even if a radical reassessment is necessary, all parties would be better served through deep consideration and evidence-based understanding of the core issues. Vic Kelly understood the curriculum and engages us in a thorough consideration of the psychological, philosophical, political and operational drivers that form the learning culture of schools and colleges. Derived form a latin word referring to a race track, perhaps we should prefer curriculum is less of a race to acquire information, and more a consideration of “all that is taught and learnt”, built upon values as much as operational mechanics and transient values.

A.V.Kelly’s “The Curriculum: Theory and Practice” – click here.

I was fortunate enough to find this marvellous video at howtopractice.com (great resource) today. Robert Duke is Professor in Music and Human Learning at the University of Texas. This video/lecture could not be more important to all educators and all learners – click here if the video is not visible (and thank you to Cornell University for distributing their resources so freely).

The great British bass player Jeff Clyne passed away on November 18th at the age of 72. A key figure in British jazz for over 40 years (appearing on recordings such as Stan Tracey’s Under Milk Wood, Tubby Hayes’100% Proof and albums by Ian Carr’s Nucleus) Jeff was much loved for his kindness and gentle humour.

Jeff Clyne 1937-2009

Forever open to all things, Jeff could be heard in the broadest range of musical settings, from Blossom Dearie, through Ronnie Scott to the free-form and experimental music of Trevor Watts, as well as his own band, Turning Point. Jeff Clyne was also active in jazz education in the UK pretty much from the beginning, co-directing the Wavendon Summer School as well as being professor of jazz double-bass at the Royal Academy of Music and Guildhall School of Music and Drama.

On a personal note, I am very saddened to hear of Jeff’s passing. Besides being one of the great British bass players, he was an immensely kind man without a bad word to say about anyone. He was also present at the worst (best) case of giggles in a teaching situation I have ever experienced, lasting several hours and into the next day! I owe him masses and consider myself very fortunate indeed to have known him.

You can read or contribute tributes at Jeff Clyne Remembered on FACEBOOK – click here.

New rules on second degrees make it too expensive for most people to have a career change – see Anne Wollenberg’s article in the Guardian (Tuesday 3 November 2009). The implications here are serious for music students).

So much for lifelong learning!