C.G.Jung mistrusted “the crowd”.

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The great British public’s vote is ample evidence of why Jung was spot on. Notwithstanding the reasoned views of a small minority of leave campaigners, the process of referendum has paradoxically undermined democracy and afforded a dangerous victory to the baying crowd of hateful, latent xenophobes. Thank goodness there is no referendum planned for abortion or capital punishment… yet.

This is what he said:
“A group experience takes place on a lower level of consciousness than the experience of an individual. This is due to the fact that, when many people gather together to share one common emotion, the total psyche emerging from the group is below the level of the individual psyche. If it is a very large group, the collective psyche will be more like the psyche of an animal, which is the reason why the ethical attitude of large organizations is always doubtful. The psychology of a large crowd inevitably sinks to the level of mob psychology. If, therefore, I have a so-called collective experience as a member of a group, it takes place on a lower level of consciousness than if I had the experience by myself alone.”

October 15th – Finchley Arts FestivalSimon Purcell Trio (Gene Calderazzo and Steve Watts) plus special guests Anita Wardell and Julian Siegel. A special event, featuring re-workings of standards and multiple combinations of music and voice. Simon used to work regularly with Anita Wardell in the 1990s… click here for the Finchley Arts Festival.

Cleveland Watkiss is a man making a difference. It is some time since Cleveland’s birthday gig at the Queen Elisabeth Hall in November 2009, which brought together 40 musicians from across the generations, peer groups and genres. A devout believer in musical multiculturalism, and innovation informed by the traditions, it is worth watching this musician’s activity.

Cleveland Watkiss with pupils from primary school in Hackney (photo by Damian Duncan)

To find out more about Cleveland, click here.

There’s a lot of hot air and conflicting opinion amongst jazz musicians and within the music colleges regarding playing and improvising in odd metres. At last there are some wise and measured thoughts in Ronan Guilfoyle’s excellent blog.

Check out his recent post “Whatever Happened to Odd Metre Swing?